Outdoor Grilling: What are you using?

obi_krash May 14, 2014

  1. TheCrabby1

    TheCrabby1 Sliders Supporting Member

    Messages:
    810
    Location:
    Burtonsville, Md
    I got this from the guy I work for on Saturday's from April thru November for the last 11 year's. It needed new burner's after 4 year's of being on a waterfront deck. I've had it so long I've replaced the burner's twice ; immediately when I got it and last year, about $200 All together. It's gas but for free I can live with it ! It took 3 of us to lift it on the deck , you can see where the bolt on end piece's bent up a little . Wonder if I could put a mild lift on ito_O 20200201_113827.jpg
     
    TerryD likes this.
  2. TerryD

    TerryD Total Tease Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,185
    Location:
    Covington, Va
    That's a nice grill even if it is profane. I'd cook on it!
     
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  3. TheCrabby1

    TheCrabby1 Sliders Supporting Member

    Messages:
    810
    Location:
    Burtonsville, Md
    It need's an external cleaning , the cover had a tear in it then rain water filled the drip tray and overflowed as u can see . It sear's and has a rotisserie thing I've never used , but the best part; Free :) No , it didn't come with the bottle !! LOL Forgot to mention it's a JennAir .
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2020
    TerryD likes this.
  4. Richard

    Richard Bought an X Supporting Member

    Messages:
    125
    Location:
    Oregon
    I agree, I have a Genesis. Top line build quality.
     
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  5. AlbatrossCafe

    AlbatrossCafe Bought an X

    Messages:
    56
    Location:
    Western WA
    Questionable pic but I have a Green Mountain Grill Daniel Boone model - a pellet grill. A smoker/grill combo that is direct competitor to a Traeger.

    I do all my grilling on this thing. It sears well enough as it can heat up to 500 degrees. I was worried at first that it would go through pellets like crazy. It starts to at 420+ degree F temps, but you don't need to hold it that hot for too long. At <400 degrees it is efficient. I don't see it being anymore of a PITA than gas.

    I like the flavor that comes with the smokiness. It makes the best ribs. Also I can control temps and it has temperature probes that I can monitor via app. So it's great for slow cooking. I can stick a big roast on it at 260 degrees and let it cook while I'm working on my X. Every once in a while I can check my phone or set an alert when the internal temp reaches 120 degrees and I need to flip it, for example.

    People say "ohh hurr durr you cook with a WiFi grill you aren't a real cook" but you still have to know what you are doing or you are gonna mess it up. Plus, most of it is in the preparation. This to me functions about like a gas grill but with the added bonus of being able to "bake" stuff as well.

    [​IMG]
     
    Zack., TheCrabby1 and TerryD like this.
  6. FishCannon

    FishCannon Test Drive

    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    My wife got me a Traeger for Christmas this year, and I'm loving it. I cook breakfast for the family on it on Saturday mornings. Love the Smoke flavor, and versatility. I still have my gas grill, but haven't used it since I got the Traeger.
     
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  7. Zack.

    Zack. First Fill-Up (of many) Supporting Member

    Messages:
    301
    Location:
    Livermore, CA
    At home: Cheapo Weber gas grill that we got as a housewarming gift. Does the job just fine, and low maintenance.

    At the family cabin up in Tahoe: OG Weber charcoal grill. A bit of a struggle if you don’t plan appropriately, but frickin nailed it the last couple of times for that nice charcoal flavor.
     
    TerryD likes this.
  8. robcarync

    robcarync Sliders

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Weber charcoal kettle grill. 22" inch. I use the "Slow n sear" charcoal basket insert, which allows you to do some crazy good smoked meats (pulled pork, ribs, chicken, turkey, Brisket, etc). It is also really good to cook steaks nice and slow to guarantee a nice medium rare finish.

    1. Pro: Having a cookout where you are smoking wood all day smells incredible.
    2. Pro: Food is so much better on charcoal because you can cook low and slow. Anyone can do burgers on propane in 10 minutes, but pull off a giant smoked pork butt? That is unique.
    3. Pro Cooking all day gives you a chance to drink bourbon and sit outside while it cooks.
    4. Con: Takess a long time to get started and get to right temperature. I use a propane torch for easy lighting and a "BBQ Dragon" device that basically is an adjustable fan to get good air flow to the coals. Makes it a bit easier. Once you learn, it isn't too difficult though.
    5. Con: Takes more practice and effort to learn. I learned from amazingribs.com and have done BBQ competitions on nothing but a weber kettle grill with good results. If you like cooking, its a good thing to learn. If you are not that excited about it as a craft of cooking, maybe not worth the effort. It definitely is more difficult than turning a dial to low, medium, or high temperature.
    All in all, I have cooked on charcoal and propane. Charcoal is totally better...but really effort prohibitive to get it going for something basic like a quick burger or a basic chicken breast. But if you are interested in BBQ style meats, or thick cut steaks, the kettle is so versatile. It is a family and friend favorite whenever the topic of cooking out comes up..."Rob do those smoked chicken thighs again" or "do those ribs again". I am a man...I have an ego I guess...I enjoy that aspect :)
     
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  9. robcarync

    robcarync Sliders

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Here are some photos of what I got going on today!

    I got the 22.5" Weber kettle with the legs chopped off. I have it recessed into a wooden grilling table, which works out pretty well for table space!

    I have the "Slow n Sear" charcoal basket. It has a built in V-notch that serves as a water pan. Fill it up with water, and it keeps the cooking chamber very humid, and also acts as a thermal buffer to help dampen temperature fluctuations. I can load up the basket and maintain a solid cooking temperature of ~250 F for 5+ hours.

    I got a baby back rack of ribs on for today...2 hours in! Mix of apple and hickory wood chips get sprinkled all in with the charcoal which makes a great flavor! SLowNSear.JPG Weber.JPG RIbs.JPG
     
  10. Prime

    Prime Some Kind of In Charge? Admin Super Moderator

    Messages:
    38,458
    Location:
    Denver-ish
    Unfortunately I've gone to gas. The only place for a grill at the house is in the deck. Since I have a walkout basement the deck is wood. And 10ft above grade. Charcoal on a wooden deck is a nono.
     
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  11. Xterrorista

    Xterrorista Bumpers Installed Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,074
    Location:
    Aurora, CO
    Same. Minus wood and basement.. I wrap water soaked wood chips in tinfoil and get smoke that way. I'll leave a crack open at one end and set it on the grate above a flame till it smokes, then pinch it off till it's smoking how I want it and move off flame a bit. Then I'll start cooking.
     
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  12. robcarync

    robcarync Sliders

    Messages:
    975
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    I've cooked some great ribs, pulled pork, and other slow cooked meats with a propane grill. It isn't ideal, but there are a couple of tricks:

    1) Just because there is a burner, doesn't mean you have to turn it on. I will put one burner on the low heat setting, and drop a pork butt or ribs on the cooler side with no direct heat. This allows the chunks of meat to cook slower without direct heat.

    2) Use a water pan to act as a thermal buffer. Use a low profile foil pan, fill it with water, and put it under the grate and over the burner. The mass of water absorbs the intense direct heat, and prevents burnt edges. It also keeps the humidity up so everything stays nice and moist.

    3) I use dry wood chips wrapped in a foil pouch with tooth pick holes poked into it for air flow. I put them under the grate and near the burner so it starts to smoke.

    4) Get a good grill thermometer near the grate level so you can adjust the burners to an actual temperature. I am playing games with a non-uniform temperature gradient to get the temperature where I want. The average grill has a thermometer that is 6 inches above where the meat is. I use a digital thermometer that has two probes, one that snaps into a holder on the grate to monitor the temperature close the meat, and one that sticks into the chunk of meat. A good thermometer makes cooking so much more consistent for me.
     
    Xterrorista likes this.
  13. 29erClan

    29erClan Bought an X Supporting Member

    Messages:
    100
    Location:
    Meh
    Lost the flip door on the Lodge cast iron grill years ago. Still love it.

    Resized_20200522_123153_7221.jpg

    High fat meat or go home!
     
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  14. TheCrabby1

    TheCrabby1 Sliders Supporting Member

    Messages:
    810
    Location:
    Burtonsville, Md
    Could I get mine Blackened ??:D
     

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